TED Talk of the Week – Carol Dweck – Power of Yet

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The live talks at this TEDxNorrkölping event have “plasticity” in common. Capabilities for problem solving and for learning (or progress) have often been regarded as (inherited) components of the personality. Both Carol Dweck and Torkel Klingberg have made quite clear, that improvements of such capabilities are supported by systematic use of appropriate training and feedback. Very essential knowledge for any parent, teacher, leader and human being in general.

Carol S. Dweck is a leading researcher in the field of motivation and is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford. Her research focuses on why students succeed and how to foster their success. More specifically, her work has demonstrated the role of mindsets in success and has shown how praise for intelligence can undermine students’ motivation and learning.
She has also held professorships at and Columbia and Harvard Universities, has lectured to education, business, and sports groups all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. She recently won the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association, one of the highest awards in Psychology, as well as six other lifetime achievement awards. Last Spring, the White House held an conference on her work and both President Obama and Michelle Obama refer to her work in their speeches on education.
Her work has been prominently featured in such publications as The New Yorker, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, and The London Times, and the Manchester Guardian, with recent feature stories on her work in the San Francisco Chronicle and the Washington Post, and she has appeared on such shows as Today, Good Morning America, NPR’s Morning Edition, and 20/20. Her bestselling book Mindset (published by Random House) has been widely acclaimed and has been translated into over 20 languages.

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